Articles

November 2022 – Question Of The Month

November 30, 2022 - By Ian Munro, Director, B Bus Sci (IS Hons) M Com (IS)

Question: What should be done for a successful internship programme?

Answer: The most important shift to be achieved through internship is to move the intern away from an attitude of getting (for instance, “I’m here to get experience”) to one of giving (“I’m here to actually give something to this job”).

If someone comes out of an internship able to clearly articulate what contribution she can make, and able to focus on that contribution, she will have an infinitely higher chance of either getting a job in your organisation or other organisations.
Nonetheless, an intern who has an entitlement attitude should not be spurned because this is part of the maturity journey. Before one enters the world of work, the world of childhood and school have typically been about you, about the results that you “get”. At school, how often do you get to make a contribution? People mature significantly through the world of work.
Ten points to bear in mind before and during an internship programme:

  1. The programme should be carefully planned and you should be sure to make a good first impression. You are representing your company to the new entrant, but remember also that you are representing the workplace generally. Will he leave after the internship with the impression that work sucks, or that your company sucks? Or will he leave with the thought that work can be an engaging and fulfilling experience where people can grow and achieve success individually and collectively? We all start off with some preconceived notions of what the workplace is going to be like and those notions are cemented or not during our early experience of work.
  2. Do not outsource this to human resources (HR). Day one should locate the intern and her designated manager together – not the intern with HR. Ensure that the intern’s manager is there before she arrives – there is nothing more awkward for the intern than sitting on a bench waiting for her manager to arrive. Schedule on the intern’s first day (or preferably before the first day) for the intern to ask the manager any questions and tell the manager what her expectations are.
  3.  Ensure that managers taking interns are qualified to do so – in other words they understand management, they have done some sort of leadership development, and have experience in managing people, setting expectations, etc. Many managers are in their positions through the toothpaste tube effect – they are eventually pushed upwards but have no management training. At a minimum, the manager should know what she needs to give and what makes X a good leader and Y a bad leader, and what that implies for leading an intern.
  4. “Just an intern” is still a person with a career in front of her. It’s not an opportunity to unleash your worst people on her. Remember other people in your organisation are also observing how you treat the intern.
  5. Get to know the intern and hold an informal function so that other people in her work surroundings can get to know her.
  6. Ensure that both the intern and the manager have the tools that they need to succeed. Ensure that very soon after arrival the intern is given networks and broader exposure, and the confidence to ask questions and challenge.
  7. Don’t make generational assumptions like “he is acting like a brat because he is from generation Y” or “this generation doesn’t know how to behave”. If we look back realistically, we were all there once.
  8. Teach the intern to be respectful – which means you treat him with respect. The most important thing you can do to prepare an intern is to actually listen to him and give his questions the countenance they deserve.
  9. Be extra careful with accountability. Keenly understand the difference between making a mistake and doing something malevolent deliberately. Recognise the intern for work which is done to the standard; reward him for work which is done to above the standard; censure him for below-standard work done carelessly; and discipline him for malevolently doing below-standard work. Don’t tolerate mediocrity or immaturity.
  10. The most important thing you can do for an intern during the internship is to allow him to gain a sense of contribution – that is, to feel what it is like to be part of something bigger than himself, doing something because it makes a difference to someone else or something else. Some interns who have an initial sense of entitlement quickly get over it; others do not. The best response to this is to take the intern aside and tell her that it is not just a matter of turning a tap and getting new or better equipment, for instance. This is a working environment where we make do and the most important thing is to make a contribution. In other words, don’t only worry about what you are getting out and what you are going to be given.
Ian Munro
Ian Munro

Leading Remotely? Make Growth A Priority!

Ian Munro

Ian Munro

November 2022 – Question Of The Month

Ian Munro

Bartleby

Why The Fuss Over Quiet Quitting?

Bartleby

Tony Flannigan

Accidental Or Deliberate Growth?

Tony Flannigan

Emma Jacobs

Middle Managers – From Motivating Staff To Maintaining Company Culture, Demands On Them Intensify As They Juggle The Expectations Of Employees And Senior Leaders

Emma Jacobs

Ian Munro

October 2022 – Question Of The Month

Ian Munro

Ian Munro

Stop Complaining And Start Leading – An Overbearing Sense Of Entitlement Isn’t Good For Your Employees Either

Ian Munro

Tony Flannigan

The Cost Of Living Versus The Cost Of Leadership

Tony Flannigan

Wendy Lambourne

September 2022 – Question Of The Month

Wendy Lambourne

Wendy Lambourne

Innovating Leadership

Wendy Lambourne