September 2021

Featured
Question of the Month
What about if someone has deliberately chosen not to follow a safe system at work or a work instruction, but he did not mean for something bad to happen? As this is a breach of health and safety regulations, he having deliberately chosen to deviate from the work instruction, is disciplinary action the right response?
Leading Legitimately – And Remotely, In A Pandemic
When Corona-19 struck, government lockdown laws in South Africa meant that employees of a financial services company were forbidden from work from its offices: they could either work at home, or not at all. The company achieved the almost-overnight IT transition for remote working relatively well (although there were many issues with connectivity and work-from-home problems), but leadership issues related to the new working mode quickly emerged.
Getting Management Visibility Right
Management visibility programmes can contribute to increasing or decreasing legitimacy in an organisation. Having spoken to recipients of management visibility programmes over the years, I have heard anecdotes in equal measure about how these programmes have been both positively and negatively received by employees.
Leaders Talk Last
When leaders truly listen they not only don’t talk but they turn down the voice in their head (their agenda) to give full and total attention to the agenda or needs of their people.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail  events@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: What about if someone has deliberately chosen not to follow a safe system at work or a work instruction, but he did not mean for something bad to happen? As this is a breach of health and safety regulations, he having deliberately chosen to deviate from the work instruction, is disciplinary action the right response?
Answer: Legitimate Leadership believes that the appropriate leadership action when somebody does not do what he/she should do or does what he/she should not do is to ascertain ‘why’. This is only fair.
There are in fact only six ‘whys’ – and the subsequent leadership action should align with the applicable ‘why’. The medicine, in other words, should match the malady.
The six ‘whys’, and appropriate leadership actions, are:
1. Lacks the means – provide the means.
2. Does not know how or why – provide training/coaching.
3. Is incapable – remove from the role/redesign the work.
4. Is sloppy/careless – censure/insist on careful.
5. Wilfully does not do it/is deliberately malevolent – discipline/sanction.
6. There is a mismatch in what is motivating/required – remove from role/redesign work.
So yes, if as is suggested the person wilfully or deliberately chose not to follow the work instruction, some disciplinary action or sanction is appropriate. If leaders fail to hold people to account for their deliberate malevolence they cannot be surprised if there is a continuation of the deliberate malevolence. 
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

CASE STUDY: LEADING LEGITIMATELY – AND REMOTELY, IN A PANDEMIC
By Stefaan van den Heever, Associate, Legitimate Leadership.
When Corona-19 struck, government lockdown laws in South Africa meant that employees of a financial services company were forbidden from work from its offices: they could either work at home, or not at all. The company achieved the almost-overnight IT transition for remote working relatively well (although there were many issues with connectivity and work-from-home problems), but leadership issues related to the new working mode quickly emerged.
The company had previous engagement with Legitimate Leadership and its framework.
When a Legitimate Leadership associate phoned one of the company’s managers concerned with learning and development, she told him that she was grappling with two major issues related to the new remote-working mode.
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE 

ARTICLE: GETTING MANAGEMENT VISIBILITY RIGHT 
By Josh Hayman, associate, Legitimate Leadership.
Management visibility programmes can contribute to increasing or decreasing legitimacy in an organisation. Having spoken to recipients of management visibility programmes over the years, I have heard anecdotes in equal measure about how these programmes have been both positively and negatively received by employees.
In 2013 and 2014 I observed such a programme making a significantly positive contribution to management/employee relationships. In the organisation concerned, a large platinum mine in South Africa, the programme was also credited with making a significant contribution to improved safety performance that was unmatched in its industry.
Their “Visible Felt Leadership” (VFL) programme, which I witnessed over two years, got the following 5 things right:
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY  CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: LEADERS TALK LAST
By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership and motivational speaker. 
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: We argue at Legitimate Leadership that leaders gain trust whenever they suspend their agenda for their people’s agenda. Listening is a good example of that. When leaders truly listen they not only don’t talk but they turn down the voice in their head (their agenda) to give full and total attention to the agenda or needs of their people. We agree with Simon Sinek wholeheartedly, therefore, when he encourages leaders to develop the practice of being the last to speak.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: Nelson Mandela is an important case study in leadership because different personalities are viewed differently in different places in the world, but Nelson Mandela is regarded as a great leader everywhere.
Nelson Mandela was born the son of a tribal chief. When asked by a journalist how he had become a great leader, he said, ‘When I was a boy I remember going to tribal meetings with my father and I remember that they always sat in a circle and my father was always the last to speak.’
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE VIDEO
CLICK HERE

August 2021

Featured
Question of the Month
In a corporation, what is the best way to achieve the results desired by management?
Right Now! That Is The Right Time To Start Building Trust With Your Team
Last year when we (Legitimate Leadership) called several of our clients to ask whether they would be willing to participate in an investigation we were planning, we didn’t know what to expect. The point of the investigation would be to review the effect of the global pandemic crisis on trust in management.
What Accounts For Trust In Management
Our experience, consistently and without exception over the past 25 years, is that management (both individually and collectively) are trusted or not on the strength of their personal interest in the wellbeing of their people.
Marcus Aurelius Did Not Come Out Of The Womb A Leader
It always amazes me that companies would never put someone on an expensive piece of equipment without training them to use it – but are happy to put someone in charge of other people’s lives without preparing them for the task.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail  events@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: In a corporation, what is the best way to achieve the results desired by management?
Answer: In my experience of corporations, middle and senior managers spend a great deal of their time in setting, measuring and worrying about whether they and their people are achieving the targeted results. If they spent that time ensuring that their people had the means, ability and accountability to achieve those results, they would be much more successful, and with much greater job satisfaction for all concerned.
Obviously the results are very important. In any competitive environment, one competes to win, not lose. But the best way to achieve a given result is neither to focus on it nor to obsessively measure progress against it. A desire to stand on the top of the world, and a determination of how far short of the top one is, does not get the relatively few people who succeed in conquering Everest to do so.
Similarly, a fixation on the score on the scoreboard, relative to other athletes’ scores is not what gains a winning score for the athlete. Nor does an ambition to progress up the hierarchy assure promotion to the desired position. Read the full answer by  clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: RIGHT NOW! THAT IS THE RIGHT TIME TO START BUILDING TRUST WITH YOUR TEAM
By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Last year when we (Legitimate Leadership) called several of our clients to ask whether they would be willing to participate in an investigation we were planning, we didn’t know what to expect. The point of the investigation would be to review the effect of the global pandemic crisis on trust in management. The organisation referenced in this vignette operates in the travel industry – one of the hardest-hit by the crisis. Would they be willing to talk to us about how local lockdowns, bans on international travel and devastating drops in revenues had affected staff morale and manager-employee relations? I wasn’t sure.
As it turns out, they participated willingly in our interviews – and our conversations left me personally optimistic. It wasn’t that the organisation had managed to entirely avoid cost-cutting and reduced working hours. They had done both of these things. At the same time their people had borne increased workloads and had to deal with increasingly emotional, anxious and rude clients – and, of course, had faced unprecedented levels of personal uncertainty and income insecurity.
Yet, despite all these potentially damaging impacts, according to those interviewed, trust within the organisation had actually improved over the four months since the start of the crisis.
Below is not a comprehensive to-do list for management teams wanting to build trust. These are simply some of the highlights in an organisation that got it right in a time of crisis. For many managers the current crisis presents a convenient excuse to put these things off for another day when we have more certainty, more resources, and most critically, more time to spend doing the things that we know will build trust with our people.
The problem is that trust doesn’t stand still. If it isn’t improving little by little, then it’s likely deteriorating little by little. Every day, until it’s too late. So, when is the right time to start building trust with your team? Answer: Right now.
READ THE FULL VIGNETTE BY CLICKING HERE 

ARTICLE: WHAT ACCOUNTS FOR TRUST IN MANAGEMENT
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
That employees trust those in charge of an enterprise is vitally important for two reasons.
Firstly, the more employees trust management, the more prepared they are to go above and beyond in pursuit of the organisation’s objectives. There is a cause-and-effect relationship, in other words, between trust in management and employee willingness.
Secondly, a precondition for sustainable organisational change is high trust in the relationship between leaders and the people they lead. When trust is high even radical change is doable. When trust is low – or worse, when there is distrust between the parties – change is inordinately difficult, if not impossible, to effect.
In short, employees will go the extra mile and embrace change to the degree that they trust those who exercise authority over them.
But what accounts for this highly sought-after, but often not realised, trust in those in authority in organisations?
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY  CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: MARCUS AURELIUS DID NOT COME OUT OF THE WOMB A LEADER
By the Daily Stoic, www.dailystoic.com
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: It always amazes me that companies would never put someone on an expensive piece of equipment without training them to use it – but are happy to put someone in charge of other people’s lives without preparing them for the task. While some people are more naturally leaders than others, developing as a leader is a process not an event. Moreover it is a process which takes place over a lifetime. Leaders stand or fall on the basis of their intent or motive. As those in leadership roles grow as leaders they develop an increasing capacity to give unconditionally. And this, one could argue, is also the purpose of life – to polish one’s own intent, not somebody else’s!
THE ARTICLE: Marcus Aurelius did not come out of the womb a leader. Nor was he an emperor ‘by blood.’ In fact, when first told he was to be king, he wept – thinking of all the bad and failed kings of history.
So how did he get from there to ‘philosopher king’? Book 1 of Meditations shows us.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

June 2021

Featured
Question of the Month
What is the best way of inculcating a desired set of values in an organisation?
Changing The Ratio Of Satisfactory To Exceptional Performers From 2:1 To 1:2
I asked a client to guesstimate the percentage of “exceptional”, “satisfactory” and “poor” contributors in a critical frontline role in his business. I was impressed by his claim that the business had no poor performers. The reason for this was, “We do not tolerate less-than-acceptable … underperformers are helped to achieve a satisfactory level of performance or are exited from the business.”
What We Have Learnt From Leading Remotely With Legitimacy Workshops
Organisations have had to navigate crises and uncertainty on a scale rarely seen before – without a template to follow. Some organisations have adapted and emerged stronger; others are struggling and are disappearing.
We All Make Mistakes – But Are They Good Or Bad Mistakes?
Mistake. The word invokes conflicting reactions in me: mostly positive sentiments synonymous with courage, learning and growth; but also, sometimes, outright contempt.
You Are Your Competition
Finite players set out to beat the people around them. Infinite players play to be better than themselves – to wake up every day and ask, ‘How can we make our company a better version of itself today than it was yesterday, how can we create a product this week that’s better than the product we created last week?’

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail  events@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: What is the best way of inculcating a desired set of values in an organisation?
Answer: Legitimate Leadership is a strong advocate that the leadership of any organisation should develop a set of values which provide everyone in the organisation with clarity about what is important and valued, both within the organisation and in its dealings with external stakeholders. This is because Legitimate Leadership is definitively an ethical framework which argues for values- rather than needs-driven behaviour by all at work, but particularly by those in leadership roles.
Managers in organisations often seek to inculcate the company’s values by means of a training or educational process. But values are not an ABILITY issue, they are a matter of the WILL. No matter how well designed or delivered, a training intervention will do little if anything to align employee behaviour with company values.
Read the full answer by clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: CHANGING THE RATIO OF SATISFACTORY TO EXCEPTIONAL PERFORMERS FROM 2:1 TO 1:2
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
I asked a client to guesstimate the percentage of “exceptional”, “satisfactory” and “poor” contributors in a critical frontline role in his business. I was impressed by his claim that the business had no poor performers. The reason for this was, “We do not tolerate less-than-acceptable … underperformers are helped to achieve a satisfactory level of performance or are exited from the business.”
According to the client, the split of those in frontline roles was 70% “satisfactory” and 30% “exceptional”.
I then challenged him with the following question, “If two out of three rather than one out of three were exemplars, would that make a difference to the results?”
“Absolutely,” he replied. His company went on to achieve this change by doing the following five things:
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY  CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WHEN LEADING REMOTELY, SPEND LESS TIME MANAGING AND MORE TIME ENABLING
By Stefaan van den Heever, associate, Legitimate Leadership.
Our lives have changed significantly over the last year, both personally and professionally. Organisations have had to navigate crises and uncertainty on a scale rarely seen before – without a template to follow. Some organisations have adapted and emerged stronger; others are struggling and are disappearing.
As I’ve engaged with clients and organisations, it has become clear that people’s health – particularly mental health – has been impacted negatively. The need for leadership is stronger now than ever. In a time when people work from home with greater flexibility, there is more need for values-driven leadership, in which leaders engage with integrity, generosity and courage.
The principles of leadership stay the same whether you are co-located or remote, but this remote world has certainly raised the bar for leaders to step up and to demonstrate their intent. I believe there is a huge opportunity for managers to engage as leaders, and for them to touch the lives of the people in their charge. Having facilitated a number of Legitimate Leadership’s Leading Remotely with Legitimacy workshops over the past year, which aim to enable leaders to lead effectively in this new reality, I have some insights to share:
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WE ALL MAKE MISTAKES – BUT ARE THEY GOOD OR BAD MISTAKES?
By Angela Donnelly, Director, Legitimate Leadership Canada.
Mistake. The word invokes conflicting reactions in me: mostly positive sentiments synonymous with courage, learning and growth; but also, sometimes, outright contempt.
All mistakes might offer the opportunity to learn, but nonetheless there are good mistakes and bad mistakes – and the difference has implications for managing performance in organisations.
In consulting, there is much to be gained from examining the appropriate use of the word “mistake” in different contexts. Because this is the difference between workplace conditions that unleash creativity and innovation, and those where people wallow in a quagmire of fear and inertia.
For leaders, this is the difference between inviting human excellence and sustaining mediocrity and outright malevolence.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: YOU ARE YOUR COMPETITION
By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership, and motivational speaker.
COMMENT BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP, ON THIS VIDEO: Good leaders act on the dictum that “the world belongs to the happily discontented”. They make it their business to continually raise the bar or raise the standard. In doing so, they are practising ‘tough love’. They are challenging their people not to remain in their comfort zone or to accept the current is good enough”. Their goal is not to be better than the rest; their goal is to continually strive to be better than they were before.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: Finite players set out to beat the people around them. Infinite players play to be better than themselves – to wake up every day and ask, ‘How can we make our company a better version of itself today than it was yesterday, how can we create a product this week that’s better than the product we created last week?’
It’s not about being ranked number one, about having more followers on Twitter than your friends, or outdoing anyone; it’s about how to outdo yourself.
It’s not about selling more books or getting more TED views than somebody else; it’s about how to make sure that the work that you’re producing is better than the work you produced before.
You are your competition and that is what ensures you stay in the game the longest. And that is what ensures you find joy, because joy comes not from comparison but from advancement
TO VIEW THE VIDEO CLICK HERE

May 2021

Featured

Question of the Month
What should a manager do if the members of his/her team who produce the best results act like a law unto themselves?
Why Project Managers Often Fail To Lead
A project typically makes something meaningfully different in the world – it creates a new or better building structure or program, for instance. If the people in your project team don’t feel this wider purpose, you are failing and you should look in the mirror.
When Leading Remotely, Spend Less Time Managing And More Time Enabling
I have met many managers who cling tightly to the belief that people need to be managed. One manager I worked with held so tightly to this belief that even when the rest of the organisation had implemented remote working policies he told his team that the new policy didn’t apply to them.
Why True Leaders Never Blame Others (Or Circumstances)
Most of us are naturally adept at deflecting responsibility, especially when things get tricky. This tendency blossoms when we’re very young. A child is often quick to explain how their shirt “got dirty” by itself – rather than how they wiped their peanut-butter-and-jelly-covered hands all over it.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail  events@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Josh Hayman, Associate, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: What should a manager do if the members of his/her team who produce the best results act like a law unto themselves??
Answer: When I have asked this question of managers, they have typically given me a list of reasons which fall into the categories of Willing (the leader lacks the courage or is conflict-averse or wants to be liked too much, or he doesn’t care enough and is prepared to tolerate less than the best especially if the results are good); Able (he lacks the knowledge/training to diagnose performance issues, or has not been taught how to have the “tough conversation”); and Allowed (the environment is not conducive to the leader doing so – there not enough time, he is too busy pursuing the result, he lacks the authority to discipline or reward, the procedures are too complex, or there is a lack of support up the line).
But a reason which is not given, and which I have observed over the years is actually the primary reason why managers do not hold their people accountable, is… Read the full answer by clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

WEBINAR REPORT: WHY PROJECT MANAGERS OFTEN FAIL TO LEAD
A project typically makes something meaningfully different in the world – it creates a new or better building structure or program, for instance. If the people in your project team don’t feel this wider purpose, you are failing and you should look in the mirror.
Organisations generally see projects as “one and done”. But all organisations also essentially want to deliver a better version of themselves and they can do this through projects. So it should be key, as part of projects, to deliver people who are excellent and improved in capability.
Of course if you are building a bridge you can’t just have happy/more capable people and no bridge. But shifting the focus from the outcome of the project to helping the people on the project deliver their best does not mean foregoing the outcome. You deliver both the project and the people when you focus on one of them – namely, enabling your people to give their best, stretching them and keeping them accountable for doing so. In other words, you serve the team first and not the result first.
Legitimate Leadership says that people become more willing and motivated when they trust their leaders more. As a leader, if you don’t spend time on building trust, then you will spend time on managing the fallout and damage from not having built trust.
The above were some of the insights offered by presenters in a webinar entitled Why Project Managers Often Fail to Lead, held by Legitimate Leadership on 7 May 2021. The webinar was moderated by Ian Munro and the presenters were Josh Hayman and Rachael Cowin, all of Legitimate Leadership. 60 people attended the webinar from a number of countries. The webinar expanded on an article by Josh, What Projects Really Need Are Better Project Leaders, Not Better Project Managers
READ THE FULL REPORT BY CLICKING HERE
VIEW THE VIDEO OF THE WEBINAR BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WHEN LEADING REMOTELY, SPEND LESS TIME MANAGING AND MORE TIME ENABLING
I have met many managers who cling tightly to the belief that people need to be managed. One manager I worked with held so tightly to this belief that even when the rest of the organisation had implemented remote working policies he told his team that the new policy didn’t apply to them. We had a couple of debates about his situation; specifically about my suggestion that maybe he should reconsider his view. I didn’t think I was making much headway, when suddenly in early 2020 the government stepped in and made it very clear that working-from-home policies applied to everyone in his company – his team included.
His position stemmed from two considerations, both of which missed the critical point that the only productivity you should ever be managing is your own productivity.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WHY TRUE LEADERS NEVER BLAME OTHERS (OR CIRCUMSTANCES)
By John Rex, former CFO of Microsoft North America and now an executive coach, writing in Forbes Magazine.
COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Legitimate Leadership has a very practical and powerful tool that leaders can use to change in the first instance themselves, and thereafter their people, from what John Rex calls a “victim mindset” to a “responsible mindset”. This tool enables three shifts which together deliver a person who has regained his/her power irrespective of the circumstances prevailing.
1. A shift in ATTENTION forwards from past/present to future.
2. A shift in INTENTION from a concern about what one is getting/not getting to what one should and can give or contribute in the situation.
3. A shift in ACCOUNTABILITY from not taking accountability to taking accountability for the circumstances that the person is in.
For more information on using the Gripe to Goal tool, see the book Legitimate Leadership (2012), p216-231.
TEXT OF THE ARTICLE: When I was a kid, I’d often tag along with my dad while he was running errands. We lived in a small town with no big-box stores, so we’d typically end up in homey mom-and-pop shops with witty cartoons displayed behind their counters.
During one of these outings, while my dad was chatting with the shop owner, I noticed one particular cartoon that has stuck in my head over the years. It depicted some poor soul wading in a marsh, stalked by alligators. The caption read, “When you’re up to your neck in alligators, it’s hard to remember that your original objective was to drain the swamp!”
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

April 2021

Featured

Question of the Month
Why do managers in organisations generally not hold their people accountable?
Legitimate Leadership Presents To The British Army
Legitimate Leadership in the UK last month took up an invitation to address the Headquarters, Home Command, of the British Army.
An Empowerment Model For Cleaning The Lab
In a major chemical plant, an ongoing problem was that its testing laboratory, which operated 24×7, was old and dirty, and the small team of analysts who staffed it were resistant to cleaning it properly.
Reducing Control To Cultivate Accountability
“To be granted legitimate power in the workplace there needs to be a preparedness by the leader to let go of her need to control the outcome,” I pronounce. The faces of 16 senior executives stare back at me in silent disbelief.
I Like You – Who Cares?
When you say “I like” someone or something, you are expressing a positive feeling. It may dispose you to behave in a positive way, to engage in conversation with that person, or buy his latest book (if he is an author whose previous books you have liked).
When Leading Remotely, Don’t Miss The Opportunity To Commit To Your Values
The role that organisational values play in defining the way people behave in modern organisations is frequently overstated. It’s not that values shouldn’t play a leading role (we certainly believe they should), it’s simply that in most organisations they don’t.
Building Trust When Working Remotely
Take it from someone who has run a virtual company for over a decade: trying to build trust without any kind of human contact is way more difficult. A big mistake that a lot of organizations have made is that because they’ve adapted reasonably well to teleworking they have missed the fact that many of the relationships pre-existed – they know these people.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail  events@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lamboure, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: Why do managers in organisations generally not hold their people accountable?
Answer: When I have asked this question of managers, they have typically given me a list of reasons which fall into the categories of Willing (the leader lacks the courage or is conflict-averse or wants to be liked too much, or he doesn’t care enough and is prepared to tolerate less than the best especially if the results are good); Able (he lacks the knowledge/training to diagnose performance issues, or has not been taught how to have the “tough conversation”); and Allowed (the environment is not conducive to the leader doing so – there not enough time, he is too busy pursuing the result, he lacks the authority to discipline or reward, the procedures are too complex, or there is a lack of support up the line).
But a reason which is not given, and which I have observed over the years is actually the primary reason why managers do not hold their people accountable, is… Read the full answer by clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

EVENT: LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP PRESENTS TO THE BRITISH ARMY
Legitimate Leadership in the UK last month took up an invitation to address the Headquarters, Home Command, of the British Army.
Legitimate Leadership had been asked to address a virtual internal conference of the headquarters on leadership and change. Wendy Lambourne and David Harding, both of Legitimate Leadership, gave their presentation the title “Serve To Lead” because that is the name of a handbook used by officers at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.
The presentation and questions, which lasted for an hour, was held on 2 March 2021, and was attended by about 50 military personnel and 30 civilians.
READ THE FULL REPORT BY CLICKING HERE

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: AN EMPOWERMENT MODEL FOR CLEANING THE LAB
In a major chemical plant, an ongoing problem was that its testing laboratory, which operated 24×7, was old and dirty, and the small team of analysts who staffed it were resistant to cleaning it properly. They variously said it was “just old” and would “just get dirty again”, and that “cleaning it would be like polishing a turd”.
Checklists which had been drawn up for cleaning were too long and were not adhered to. Not surprisingly, the dirtiness of the laboratory negatively affected the analysts’ morale.
Management did not have the will to change this and did not hold the analysts to account for their failure to clean – especially at night and on weekends, when no managers were present anyway.
But then things changed:
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: REDUCING CONTROL TO CULTIVATE ACCOUNTABILITY
By Angela Donnelly, Director, Legitimate Leadership Canada.
“To be granted legitimate power in the workplace there needs to be a preparedness by the leader to let go of her need to control the outcome,” I pronounce. The faces of 16 senior executives stare back at me in silent disbelief.
But this is a pivotal moment for me to slay some inherent leadership convictions of contemporary corporate culture. So I take a deep breath and jump right in.
This awkward moment follows a morning of exploring a leadership challenge: why some people seem to work because they have to and others because they want to. At least participants do agree that the latter is preferable.
But the corporate world is navigating the consequences of the prevalent profit-above-people approach to leadership.
Many companies respond to the thorny issue of attracting and retaining employees by plying them with “nice things”. And of course it is nice to provide award-winning workplaces. But when I saunter back to my desk after a game of foosball, smoothie in hand, Rufus bounding at my heels, to do some serious work ahead of my desk-side foot massage, yet my boss is still an asshole – then, let’s face it, all the nice stuff is for nothing!
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: I LIKE YOU – WHO CARES?
By Maureen Collins, founder, Straight Talk.
COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Care, from a Legitimate Leadership viewpoint, is a matter of intent or motive. For those in authority at work, care is about whose interests are being served. Leaders who care are in the relationship to “give” to their people not to “get” something out of them. Whether leaders care about their people is evidenced in where they spend their time and what they give their attention to. When leaders don’t give time and attention to their people, their people will conclude that something is more important to the leaders then them. Care should not be confused with being “nice”. Leaders can be anything but “nice” as long as their tough behaviour is in their people’s best interests. Care, in other words, is definitely not a soft and fluffy thing.
THE ARTICLE: There is a world of difference between liking someone and caring about them.
When you say “I like” someone or something, you are expressing a positive feeling. It may dispose you to behave in a positive way, to engage in conversation with that person, or buy his latest book (if he is an author whose previous books you have liked).
Or it may not. We have Facebook to thank for making ‘like’ probably the most over-used verb in the world today. Online likes have become a metric by which popularity is measured. They may be used to guide a sales campaign, to which you, one of possibly millions who clicked “Like”, will be asked to respond.
Liking carries no commitment. There are many people you like, but make no effort to approach, think about, or spend time with. And unless you get to know them, and care about them, you won’t be there for them if they need help.
Care is an action verb. The dictionary definition is ‘to provide what is necessary for the health, welfare, maintenance, and protection of someone or something’.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WHEN LEADING REMOTELY, DON’T MISS THE OPPORTUNITY TO COMMIT TO YOUR VALUES
By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
The role that organisational values play in defining the way people behave in modern organisations is frequently overstated. It’s not that values shouldn’t play a leading role (we certainly believe they should), it’s simply that in most organisations they don’t. There’s no doubt that aligning organisation behaviours and practices with a set of aspirational values is hard and most organisations fail to get it right.
While today’s typical organisation probably does have a set of values on the wall behind reception for people to read on the way in, what actually happens on the floor is far too often (and occasionally radically) misaligned. Both leaders and team members have grown fatigued by hearing one thing and experiencing another. Yet, the move to remote leadership as the “new normal” for many leaders might be precisely the catalyst that organisations need to get their values off the reception wall and into the day-to-day behaviours and practices of their people on the ground.
There are three opportunities.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: BUILDING TRUST WHEN WORKING REMOTELY
By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership, and motivational speaker.
COMMENT BY IAN MUNRO, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP, ON THIS VIDEO: In this video Simon Sinek suggests that building trust in virtual organisations, especially where new people have joined the team, is far more difficult than in traditional companies. One of the reasons for this is the reduced opportunity to connect interpersonally between meetings – the so-called water cooler conversations. The Legitimate Leadership Model reasons that trust is built primarily in four ways – getting to know people, giving people time and attention, passing the intent test, and handing over control. The first three in particular are sincere demonstrations of care, which in turn set out the conditions for the fourth – an increased propensity to extend trust, or hand over control. We are, therefore, in strong agreement with the video’s recommendation that leaders proactively seek and create opportunities to connect at a personal level with their people. Good managers have respectful, professional relationships with their people. Good leaders go about building sincere, personal relationships. Another point of strong agreement is the assertion that workplaces are likely to become increasingly flexible in their remote working policies. An investigation carried out by Legitimate Leadership last year found that one of the most important expectations people have of the future of work is increased flexibility – particularly in supporting employees who see value in spending some or possibly all of their time working from home.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: Take it from someone who has run a virtual company for over a decade: trying to build trust without any kind of human contact is way more difficult. A big mistake that a lot of organizations have made is that because they’ve adapted reasonably well to teleworking they have missed the fact that many of the relationships pre-existed – they know these people.
But good luck building trust with somebody who’s entirely new to the team and has never physically met anyone.
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE

March 2021

Featured

Question of the Month
An employee finds out that he is earning 5% less than his peers, and assumes that the organisation and the management are unfair. This demotivates him and he considers finding another job. What should be done?
Legitimate Leadership Launches New Website On Its Seventh Birthday
Legitimate Leadership launched its new website (www.legitimateleadership.com) and celebrated its seventh birthday at a dinner held in Johannesburg on 4 March 2021.
Enabling The Shift From Taking To Giving In An Organisation
You may coach people to be contributors, but if the system/department/organisation they are in does not change, those people are likely to eventually revert back to what they were before.
‘Us And Them’ Became Just ‘Us’
A Legitimate Leadership intervention in a major industrial company in South Africa identified a problem of victimhood throughout the organisation.
Are Anonymous Callout Channels A Good Way To Deal With Abuse?
Bullying and abuse have been prominent in news reports about, among others, Priti Patel (the UK’s Home Secretary), Julie Payette (Canada’s Governor General), and Meghan Markle (the Duchess of Sussex). One question these cases prompt is: are anonymous callout channels a good way to deal with abuse?
Ceo Secrets – ‘My Billion Pound Company Has No Hr Department’
Greg Jackson is the founder and CEO of Octopus Energy, a UK start-up valued at more than £1.4bn ($2bn), selling green energy. Despite now having more than 1,200 employees, he says he has no interest in traditional things like human resources (HR) and inf ormation technology (IT) departments.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail  events@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: An employee finds out that he is earning 5% less than his peers, and assumes that the organisation and the management are unfair. This demotivates him and he considers finding another job. What should be done?
Answer: This question arose in a recent Legitimate Leadership webinar – see our report on this below. Before, this employee was a net contributor – in other words, he was not withholding. Then he withdrew his willingness due to a sense of grievance and grudge.
The problem is that he is falling into a victim’s state of mind.
His manager should challenge him not to have a victim mindset and to focus on what he can control. Strong people focus on what they can control, not on what the world does to them. In other words, the manager here can help the employee to restore his sense of accountability.
The manager should enable the person to see what is happening to him in the situation. the question is how he is going to respond to the fact that life is sometimes unfair. The manager should challenge him to promote growth, rather than encourage him to rail against the system.
The employee/manager may also simultaneously try to solve the unfairness issue – but it should not be the primary focus.
But wait … what if the unfairness is more than just a small salary differential? What if it is a matter, for instance, of ingrained gender/race bias? See our webinar report below for comment on this.
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

EVENT: LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE ON ITS SEVENTH BIRTHDAY
Legitimate Leadership launched its new website (www.legitimateleadership.com) and celebrated its seventh birthday at a dinner held in Johannesburg on 4 March 2021.
Legitimate Leadership has grown from a one-person (Wendy Lambourne) business at its inception in March 2014 to a company embracing 24 staff members, associates and licensees.
The function in Johannesburg was physically attended by 20 people; a further 16 people attended the function virtually from other parts of South Africa and from England, Scotland, Belgium, Germany and Canada.
Legitimate Leadership now has operational centres in South Africa and England, and licensees in Europe and Canada.

WEBINAR: ENABLING THE SHIFT FROM TAKING TO GIVING IN AN ORGANISATION
You may coach people to be contributors, but if the system/department/organisation they are in does not change, those people are likely to eventually revert back to what they were before.
In past Legitimate Leadership webinars, the focus was generally on leadership. In this webinar, the focus was shifted to how leaders can assist people in their teams to shift from taking to giving.
In other words, in this webinar it was assumed that the leader is performing well and that she is fundamentally giving rather than taking.
This webinar, on 11 February 2021, was presented by three Legitimate Leadership consultants: Ian Munro, Peter Jordan and Stefaan van den Heever. It was attended by 68 people from various countries.
The three presenters commented on questions arising from vignettes which were drawn from their own experiences and from questions from attendees.
VIGNETTE 1:
An employee finds out that he is earning 5% less than his peers. He assumes immediately that the organisation and the management are unfair. This demotivates him and he considers finding another job.
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: ARE ANONYMOUS CALLOUT CHANNELS A GOOD WAY TO DEAL WITH ABUSE?
By Angela Donnelly, Director, Legitimate Leadership Canada.
Bullying and abuse have been prominent in news reports about, among others, Priti Patel (the UK’s Home Secretary), Julie Payette (Canada’s Governor General), and Meghan Markle (the Duchess of Sussex). One question these cases prompt is: are anonymous callout channels a good way to deal with abuse?
I recently weighed in on an article in the Harvard Business Review, Time’s Up for Toxic Workplaces. The article suggested that companies should incorporate or strengthen anonymous feedback channels for employees to voice concerns and report abusive experiences without fear of retribution. Peer managers, superiors or HR could deliver the relevant feedback to managers, making it clear that the organisation does not tolerate this kind of behavior. Knowing that others disapprove may lead the perpetrators to self-correct, the article said.
I commented that legitimacy in the manager-employee relationship is at stake here. Focusing on empowerment of employees and simultaneously creating a leadership culture that places people and excellence at the core of the business will foster the conditions where civility and maturity thrive. Anonymous callout channels are damaging and cowardly ideas; one should rather be deliberately building courage and generosity in the system, to produce masters rather than perpetuate victims.
As I expected, there wasn’t overwhelming support for my viewpoint.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: CEO SECRETS – ‘MY BILLION POUND COMPANY HAS NO HR DEPARTMENT’
By Dougal Shaw, business reporter, BBC News.
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Let us not throw the baby out with the bathwater. There is a role for support functions in companies big enough to afford them. But they need to perform an enabling rather than a controlling or policing role. The HR function’s role is not to do the “care and growth” job for line managers but rather to enable and support them in doing so.
I love the story with the receptionist. She taught Greg a lesson which in a single instant helped him to “grow up”. Leadership requires a level of personal maturity that takes time to develop. In the process of leading others, the leader is the ultimate beneficiary – he or she grows as a human being.
THE ARTICLE: Greg Jackson is the founder and CEO of Octopus Energy, a UK start-up valued at more than £1.4bn ($2bn), selling green energy. Despite now having more than 1,200 employees, he says he has no interest in traditional things like human resources (HR) and information technology (IT) departments.
There is a tendency for large companies to “infantilise” their employees and “drown creative people in process and bureaucracy”, says Jackson.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

February 2021

Featured

Question of the Month
What should a Legitimate Leadership intervention deliver?
Leading Remotely? Stay Connected By Being Sincere, Deliberate And Courageous
For many managers remote working has highlighted the transactional nature of the relationships they have with their people. It is entirely possible to work next to, or even with, somebody every day for years without ever really getting to know him or developing a genuine concern for his welfare.
What Leaders Should Do About Targets And Standards In A Crisis
Leaders can choose to make targets or make standards what they focus on and prioritise in a crisis. They can also elect to change (raise or lower) the targets and/or standards, or leave them unchanged.
The Purpose Of A Company Is Not To Make Money
Legitimate Leadership believes that goals/targets/metrics are important, but as a means not an end. Firstly, they provide the context within which to define the contributions that need to be made – if you…

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: What should a Legitimate Leadership intervention deliver?
Answer: Our standard answer is that it should deliver an organization characterised by legitimacy, trust, contribution and accountability – all of which then impacts on the results.
However here are two more developed characterisations:
That those in leadership roles will be able to answer ‘yes’ to the following:
  • Should the leader move on would his/her direct reports like (which doesn’t mean they will in fact) to go with him/her because of the benefits in terms of care and growth that they have experienced in their reporting relationship with him/her?
  • Should the person move on, is there is a successor from within (or as someone expressed it when they were promoted into their ex-manager’s role ‘he made me’).
That those in the frontline of the business will be able to answer ‘yes’ to the following:
  • They are able to articulate what they are willing and able to deliver which is of value-add and for which they would like to be held accountable.
  • They are asking their manager to come and view what they have delivered because they are proud of the quality of their work.
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

ARTICLE: LEADING REMOTELY? STAY CONNECTED BY BEING SINCERE, DELIBERATE AND COURAGEOUS
By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
“How do I stay connected to my people when they’re working remotely?”
“How can I show people that I care without seeming like I’m prying?”
These are questions that have been raised repeatedly by managers grappling with remote leadership for the first time. The answer to neither question is simple – relationships are, after all, complex by their nature. But the following points are worth bearing in mind as we work to build and maintain our own relationships with our direct reports remotely:
  1. It’s not only possible to maintain relationships at a distance but many people have, in fact, reported improving their relationships while their teams have been working remotely.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: LEADING REMOTELY? STAY CONNECTED BY BEING SINCERE, DELIBERATE AND COURAGEOUS
By Wendy Lambourne, Director, Legitimate Leadership.
Leaders can choose to make targets or make standards what they focus on and prioritise in a crisis. They can also elect to change (raise or lower) the targets and/or standards, or leave them unchanged. The choices they make are important because they have a significant bearing on whether those they lead thrive or not in difficult times.
Leaders should focus on standards, not targets, in a crisis. They should raise standards, not targets, in difficult times.
CHOICE ONE: WHAT TO FOCUS ON AND PRIORITISE IN A CRISIS
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: THE PURPOSE OF A COMPANY IS NOT TO MAKE MONEY
By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership, and motivational speaker.
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Legitimate Leadership believes that goals/targets/metrics are important, but as a means not an end. Firstly, they provide the context within which to define the contributions that need to be made – if you don’t know where you want to get to, any place will do. Secondly, the scoreboard is useful in terms of feedback – are you making enough of a contribution, or the right contributions, to achieve the results? If the results are not eventuating, do something different!
The purpose of a company is to add value to the customer, not to increase returns on investment for the shareholders. When companies succeed in serving the customer, there is a place in the sun for everyone, including the shareholders. Profits provide the means which allow a company to serve. Like the results, they are a means, not an end.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: We are tangibly-driven animals. Metrics and targets and goals are important to us. That is a good thing. Abstract is not good – it doesn’t let you know if it hasn’t worked. You can’t run a marathon with no mile markers. We need to know and be able to measure progress.
But we have to understand the role that metrics play. Metrics help us understand speed and distance, but they’re not absolutes.
The problem is when they become absolutes – for example when somebody gives us a goal and says, ‘If you hit this target you will get a bonus.’
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE

January 2021

Featured

Question of the Month
I believe a lot of the reason we fall into the traditional way of working is that we have been institutionalised as a society, taught to fear and obey authority (rather than see it as an enabler), and we sit within a hierarchy from school age (learnt behaviours). But I sense a change in this with each generation. Is the framework easier to apply in organisations with a higher ratio of younger people?
Leading Remotely – It’s Still All About Intent
Leading remotely isn’t new. Managers, especially senior managers in distributed organisations, have been leading remotely for decades…
What Baby Boomers Can Learn From Millennials At Work – And Vice Versa
A new kind of elder is emerging in the workplace. The alchemy of algorithm and people wisdom gained with age (high-tech meets high-touch) can greatly benefit millennials who are in managerial roles but have no formal leadership training.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: I believe a lot of the reason we fall into the traditional way of working is that we have been institutionalised as a society, taught to fear and obey authority (rather than see it as an enabler), and we sit within a hierarchy from school age (learnt behaviours). But I sense a change in this with each generation. Is the framework easier to apply in organisations with a higher ratio of younger people?
Answer: In one sense, once people are adults, intent is not a function of age. There are “givers” at work from the beginning of their careers and “takers” who have entirely been there to take. What Legitimate Leadership tries to do over time is change the ratio of “takers” to “givers” at work. There is a view that in fact the change is harder to effect with so called millennials. The view is that both parents and teachers are not doing as good a job as before at care and growth. Hence millennials enter the workplace entitled, expecting instant rewards. In the words of Simon Sinek this leaves managers to do the “parenting” that should have been done before they entered the workplace. It is an issue worthy of debate.
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

ARTICLE: LEADING REMOTELY – IT’S STILL ALL ABOUT INTENT
By Ian Munro, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Leading remotely isn’t new. Managers, especially senior managers in distributed organisations, have been leading remotely for decades. Remote leadership has, however, been pushed to front and centre by the events of the last 12 months.
Remote leadership in 2021 differs from the past in three important ways:
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: WHAT BABY BOOMERS CAN LEARN FROM MILLENNIALS AT WORK – AND VICE VERSA 
By Chip Conley, an American hotelier, hospitality entrepreneur, author and speaker.
COMMENT BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP, ON THIS VIDEO: We agree with Chip Conley on all counts. Firstly, that diverse teams outperform ones that are less diverse. Secondly, that diversity should include age. Thirdly, that relationship competence/leadership competence takes time to develop. This is because leading people in a way consistent with the Legitimate Leadership criteria requires a level of personal maturity which takes time to develop and which is rare in people under 35 years of age – “you can’t microwave emotional intelligence”. Finally, that enabling leadership maturity in younger leaders is a contribution which older leaders who have acquired “relationship wisdom” can make. It is a value-added “give” which should be expected and rewarded in those with more chronological age in the workplace.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: There’s ample evidence that gender- and ethnically-diverse companies are more effective. But what about age?
A new kind of elder is emerging in the workplace. The alchemy of algorithm and people wisdom gained with age (high-tech meets high-touch) can greatly benefit millennials who are in managerial roles but have no formal leadership training.
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE

December 2020

Featured

Question of the Month
How long does it takes to recognise change in individuals, teams and organisations when applying the Legitimate Leadership Model? I expect there could be some fairly rapid change on a one-to-one basis, but wider change would presumably require consistency of approach and be subject to many other influencing factors.
Insights From Within An Organisation That Keeps Getting It Right
Africa Tikkun, one of South Africa’s largest non-profit organisations, assists many thousands of people in that country’s townships. But seven years ago, this extraordinary organisation set out, with Legitimate Leadership, to increase its employees’ level of engagement by showing employees that they also really mattered.

Building Cultures Where Givers Succeed

As an organizational psychologist, I (Adam Grant) spend a lot of time in workplaces, and I find paranoia everywhere. Paranoia is caused by people that I call “takers.” Takers are self-serving in their interactions. It’s all about “What can you do for me?”
The opposite is a giver. It’s somebody who approaches most interactions by asking, “What can I do for you?”

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: How long does it takes to recognise change in individuals, teams and organisations when applying the Legitimate Leadership Model? I expect there could be some fairly rapid change on a one-to-one basis, but wider change would presumably require consistency of approach and be subject to many other influencing factors.
Answer: At an individual level, the one thing that can change in an instant is intent. I have seen this many times. For sustainable changes in behavior and practice our experience is that at least 12–15 months is needed. This is why our process for a group of leaders is of that duration. But embedding the Legitimate Leadership principles and practices so that they have real organizational impact is not a quick process. For big, complex organizations employing thousands of people it can take 3–5 years.
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

WEBINAR: INSIGHTS FROM WITHIN AN ORGANISATION THAT KEEPS GETTING IT RIGHT
Africa Tikkun, one of South Africa’s largest non-profit organisations, assists many thousands of people in that country’s townships. But seven years ago, this extraordinary organisation set out, with Legitimate Leadership, to increase its employees’ level of engagement by showing employees that they also really mattered. The results of that exercise were dramatic and were part of a major turnaround in the organisation.
Then earlier this year, Africa Tikkun pivoted again: in response to the Covid 19 pandemic it changed direction from being an organisation which supported centre-registered families, to doing emergency mass distribution of food parcels to the broader community.
How Africa Tikkun achieved these changes, and the part that Legitimate Leadership played, was the subject of this webinar, which was held on 12 November and was attended by 111 people.
READ THE FULL REPORT BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE VIDEO OF THIS WEBINAR CLICK HERE

VIDEO: BUILDING CULTURES WHERE GIVERS SUCCEED
By Adam Grant, author of Give and Take, of Wharton University, USA.
COMMENT BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP, ON THIS VIDEO: Adam Grant’s research indicates that 19% of people are “takers”, 56% are “matchers”, and 25% are “givers”. In Legitimate Leadership’s view, “matchers” (that is, those who give to get) are still takers but the giving they do is in order to get. So in fact 25% are givers and 75% are takers. This is our experience as well: in any group between 15-30% are there to give and 70-85% are there to take. So there are currently more givers than takers at work. We also agree with Adam Grant on the following: that the most successful people in the world are givers; that while there is a problem with taking, there is nothing wrong with receiving; and that you should recruit givers not takers; and that takers need to be dealt with.
However we don’t agree with Adam Grant on two matters. Firstly, Adam Grant’s type of giving is only one form of giving: generosity. There are in fact two forms of giving: generosity and courage. With generosity, you risk losing things associated with yourself; with courage, you are putting yourself on the line. Secondly, Adam Grant says that the most unsuccessful people in the world are also givers. We believe that why they are not successful is not because they are givers but because they give inappropriately. Giving is not about being nice, about burning out or allowing others to take advantage. Successful givers give either generosity or courage, whichever of the two is appropriate in the situation.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: As an organizational psychologist, I (Adam Grant) spend a lot of time in workplaces, and I find paranoia everywhere. Paranoia is caused by people that I call “takers.” Takers are self-serving in their interactions. It’s all about “What can you do for me?”
The opposite is a giver. It’s somebody who approaches most interactions by asking, “What can I do for you?”
I wanted to give you a chance to think about your own style. We all have moments of giving and taking. Your style is how you treat most of the people most of the time, your default.
I have a short test you can take to figure out if you’re more of a giver or a taker, and you can take it right now (see third illustration above).
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE

November 2020

Featured

Question of the Month
Are there people who prefer to be managed rather than led?
Different Scenarios For Learning On The Job
“Finding quality time to spend with staff is vitally important, particularly if they are inexperienced and need training to be able to carry out their role. “
Lessons Learned From Doing Leadership Diagnostics
Experience over the years working with leaders in the mining, manufacturing, banking and hospitality industries has produced the following insights on Legitimate Leadership’s Leadership Diagnostics methodology.
The Most Important Characteristic Of A Leader
The problem with leadership work (care and growth) is that it is vitally important but rarely urgent. Because of this it can be put off for another day – and typically that is what happens.

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: Are there people who prefer to be managed rather than led?
Answer: The universal answer to the question “who would you work for willingly?” is “a giver, not a taker” – that is, “someone who is in the relationship to care for and grow me”. So in the sense that caring and growing people is leadership, not management, generally people want to be led not managed.
But there are two caveats to that statement. Firstly, while all people want the person they respect to have a genuine concern for their wellbeing, to care for them as a human being not as a human resource, not everyone wants “tough love”. They may want the “nice” part of care but not the kind of care which enables them to stand on their own two feet and take responsibility for the situations that they are in. They prefer to remain “looked after”, dependent and needy rather than being supported to become strong and self-reliant.
Secondly, there are people who don’t want to be empowered.   Read full answer by clicking here.
To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: DIFFERENT SCENARIOS FOR LEARNING ON THE JOB
In a written feedback about Legitimate Leadership’s Module 1 (Building Strong People), and in particular about a prescribed article for that module, Your Diary Never Lies, a manager who had started his career as an apprentice said that at a personal level, his own career had benefitted from working with managers who took time to help him over the years and “just watching how they performed in the work place was a learning experience itself”.
“Finding quality time to spend with staff is vitally important, particularly if they are inexperienced and need training to be able to carry out their role. Delegation of tasks becomes much easier with an experienced team. This is something I learned 10 years ago when working as a programme manager. The job was easy when I had inherited a team of experienced schedulers, who knew exactly what they were doing and delivered everything that was asked of them. None of them were victims, they were a pleasure to work with and easy to manage.
“This period gave me a false sense of security, thinking that management was easy.
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY CLICKING HERE

Legitimate Leadership ProfileARTICLE: LESSONS LEARNED FROM DOING LEADERSHIP DIAGNOSTICS
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Experience over the years working with leaders in the mining, manufacturing, banking and hospitality industries has produced the following insights on Legitimate Leadership’s Leadership Diagnostics methodology: do it with benevolent intent; do on both positive and negative exceptions; use with a specific purpose in mind; apply the tool to a specific incident or result; diagnose by ‘watching the game’; ask ‘why?’ all the way up the line; remedial action needs to be owned and driven by the line; be wary of excuses – invalid means and ability claims; the improvement timeframe will be shorter when means and accountability, rather than ability, are at issue; and do both reactive and proactive diagnostics.
1. Do it with benevolent intent
READ THE FULL ARTICLE CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: THE MOST IMPORTANT CHARACTERISTIC OF A LEADER
By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership, and motivational speaker.
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, DIRECTOR, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: The problem with leadership work (care and growth) is that it is vitally important but rarely urgent. Because of this it can be put off for another day – and typically that is what happens. Leaders are not here to produce outcomes, they are here to produce the people to produce outcomes. This will only happen when they are courageous enough to focus their time and attention on the care and growth of their people, when they schedule time for the leadership work and stick to the plan. What gives leaders the courage to do this is simply the conviction that people matter and that, as those in charge of others, their job is to “give” to them not to “get” results out of them.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: I (Simon Sinek) am often asked what the most important characteristics of leadership are – vision, charisma, etc. I know plenty of incredible leaders that aren’t Steve Jobs visionaries. And I know some fantastic leaders who do not have charisma – they’re quiet and super-introverted, not that exciting to talk to or spend time with.
When I say charisma I mean the traditional definition which is more about energy. But I believe that charisma is undying belief in something – and they have that in spades.
But I think courage is the one thing that all great leaders have to have because we are surrounded by overwhelming forces every day pushing us to play the finite game. The pressures are overwhelming.
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE VIDEO CLICK HERE