Newsletter

October 2022

Featured

Question Of The Month

What should be done for a successful internship programme?

Leading Remotely? Make Growth A Priority!

Two years ago, quite abruptly, the working world many of us were used to changed. Many people who had previously spent their entire careers office-bound, suddenly found themselves working from home.

Why The Fuss Over Quiet Quitting?

Two years ago, quite abruptly, the working world many of us were used to changed. Many people who had previously spent their entire careers office-bound, suddenly found themselves working from home.


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Question Of The Month 

By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership.

Question: What should be done for a successful internship programme?

Answer: The most important shift to be achieved through internship is to move the intern away from an attitude of getting (for instance, “I’m here to get experience”) to one of giving (“I’m here to actually give something to this job”).
If someone comes out of an internship able to clearly articulate what contribution she can make, and able to focus on that contribution, she will have an infinitely higher chance of either getting a job in your organisation or other organisations.
Nonetheless, an intern who has an entitlement attitude should not be spurned because this is part of the maturity journey. Before one enters the world of work, the world of childhood and school have typically been about you, about the results that you “get”. At school, how often do you get to make a contribution? People mature significantly through the world of work.

Ten points to bear in mind before and during an internship programme:

Read the full answer by clicking here . 

To submit your question,  email info@legitimateleadership.com 


Article: Leading Remotely? Make Growth A Priority!

By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership.

Two years ago, quite abruptly, the working world many of us were used to changed. Many people who had previously spent their entire careers office-bound, suddenly found themselves working from home.

With this rapid shift to remote working it is understandable that the initial priority was about the short term. Is everyone safe? How are people’s friends and families?

As the pandemic went on, the focus shifted to enabling people to be productive at home. For most this meant focusing on technology, both hardware and software, which would enable employees to not only do their work, but also to be more collaborative and more engaged remotely.

But as lockdown conditions stubbornly continued on, dealing with longer term care issues such as physical and mental health became the priority.

More recently the focus has shifted once again – this time to rules and protocols for staying at home or returning to work (or a bit of both).

One thing that all of the above shifts in focus have in common is that they have been driven by external and mostly short-term factors. They have also directed significant focus to the short-term, which has in turn distracted us from giving sufficient attention to the longer term – particularly when it comes to people’s growth, empowerment and development.

The result: employees, especially top performers – who have often experienced genuine care and found a way to be highly productive from their bedrooms, kitchens and living rooms – are now leaving their jobs despite their success and positive experiences in search of new opportunities to grow.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE


Article: Why The Fuss Over Quiet Quitting?

By Bartleby, in The Economist.

COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE BY STUART FOULDS, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: The term ‘quiet quitting’ has recently become a buzzword, but the worldwide problem that almost 80% of employees are not fully engaged is definitely not new. At Legitimate Leadership we have been advising leaders and organisations about this challenge for many years, and we believe it is at heart a leadership issue.

Simply put, employees want to be fairly remunerated – but money alone is not enough to motivate most people to go above and beyond at work. In reality, most employees will go the extra mile only if motivated by one or more of three P’s:

  • A personal PASSION for what they do.
  • A bigger PURPOSE that makes their work inspiring and worthwhile.
  • A PERSON who displays the kind of leadership for which it’s worth going the extra mile.

All three of these motivators speak to excellence in leadership. As leaders we should be connecting our people’s work with their passions, showing them the worthwhile purpose behind our shared endeavours, and (above all) being the kind of leaders who unlock people’s energy and loyalty. We’re failing our people if we don’t do these things.

The most concerning thing about ‘quiet quitters’ may in fact be the poor leadership they’ve been receiving from their corporate bosses.

THE ARTICLE: It’s not the crime but the cover-up. And it’s not the video but the reverberations. In the past few weeks the term ‘quiet quitting’ has entered conversations about the workplace. A 17-second clip on TikTok, a social-media platform, in which an American called Zaid Khan embraces the notion of not going above and beyond at work, has caused an awful lot of noise.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE